News
Tertiary-educated adults with autism receive training for jobs in engineering sector
wavy line banner

News

News

Tertiary-educated adults with autism receive training for jobs in engineering sector

Picture of John Doe
John Doe
A woman diligently operating a computer amidst the bustling environment of a factory, focused on her tasks.

Tertiary-educated adults with autism are being trained and placed in jobs in the engineering sector under a new programme by research and technology non-profit organisation Trampolene.

The Gates (Growing Autistic Talent for Engineering Sector) programme was started in May 2022, after research showed that people with autism have one of the lowest employment rates among people with disabilities.

Those with tertiary qualifications also face underemployment owing to a high entry barrier for higher-skilled jobs, said Trampolene chief operating officer Cheok Xue Ting.

Ms You Kai Xuan is among 42 graduates of institutes of higher learning enrolled in the programme. She was unable to secure internships as part of her studies at the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) as companies told the school she was unsuitable.

The 22-year-old, who has a Nitec in infocomm technology, is working full-time as an assembly technician at precision manufacturing company Grand Venture Technology (GVT).

Young adults with autism lack executive function skills, such as planning and time estimation.

Ms Hillary Lim, who works for Trampolene as a senior job coach, helped create a timetable for Ms You. It details specific duties she must undertake. For example, it says Ms You has to test iron bars for 90 minutes from 8.30am, and “pack silver things in plastic bags and paste stickers on the bags” between 10.15am and 11.40am.

Ms Lim also held Ms You’s hand during the coaching to show her how much strength was needed when using a torque screwdriver.

Ms You needs the timetable to pace herself and manage her time. When she started working in 2022, she tired herself out before lunch as she exerted too much strength on simple tasks.

“At first, I was nervous as I was new to the environment. But I am comfortable with the supervisor and colleagues now. They guided me patiently on the tasks, and were caring and willing to help.”

The Gates programme is the first to be supported by Temasek Foundation under a pay-for-success model.

The $340,000 committed by upfront funders will be repaid if trainees stay in a job for nine months and other outcomes of job training and placement are achieved.

In this funding model, foundations, financial institutions and corporations provide upfront capital to organisations like Trampolene to serve their beneficiaries.

Outcome funders such as the Government repay upfront funders only if the project achieves outcome targets.

Ms Cheok said the pay-for-success model focuses on retention rate, an issue among young adults with autism, who tend to leave their jobs after six months.

Before the job placement, Trampolene assessed Ms You and found her suitable for hands-on work.

Ms Lim also briefed Ms You’s colleagues on how she communicates, telling them that they need to repeat or simplify instructions.

She told them they can also break down the work into small steps and share her responsibilities.

GVT chief executive Julian Ng said one of the main challenges the company encountered was communication. Some staff with autism take what others say literally and have trouble understanding abstract concepts.

For example, Ms You’s colleagues will say “I’ll get back to you by a specific time” rather than “I’ll get back to you later”.

“This improves communication for everyone in the workplace,” said Mr Ng. The company has about 150 employees at its Singapore headquarters, including three with special needs.

Trampolene also works with organisations to redesign the recruitment process and job role. With GVT, it advised the company to use work assessment instead of conventional interviews.

To match trainees with employers, Trampolene conducts tests for specific skills employers are looking for, from motor skills to data entry and quality control.

It then selects trainees able to perform the tasks, said Ms Cheok.

She said Trampolene also considers work planning, hygiene and safety awareness, and sensory challenges.

If a trainee is affected by high-frequency noises even with earplugs on, for example, he might be more suited to an office job than engineering.

Trampolene is aiming to train 70 young adults over 30 months from May 2022.

To date, it has trained 42 graduates with autism and placed 18 of them in jobs, with 13 having stayed with their employers for three months or more.

Aside from Temasek Foundation, some of the other upfront funders are Ishk Tolaram Foundation, Quantedge Foundation and Asia Philanthropic Ventures.

Outcome funders include ECCA Family Foundation and the Diana Koh Foundation through the Community Foundation of Singapore.

Mr Nicholas Tay, who has autism and holds a diploma in pharmaceutical science from Temasek Polytechnic, was hired under the programme as a production worker in ice-cream manufacturing company The Ice Cream & Cookie Co.

He sets up workstations for production, prepares packaging and places products on a conveyor system for printing or metal detection testing.Mr Damian Yip, head of production at the company, said he considered Mr Tay’s basic communication skills, education level and challenges faced at previous workplaces to decide if he was suitable for the role.

Ms Lim said Mr Tay’s main issues are perspective-taking and negative thinking. For example, when the 26-year-old began doing this job, he often felt lousy about himself when he saw others working faster than him.

“A regular person would think, ‘Oh, the person is faster than me because he has been here for a longer time than me, so he is more experienced,’” said Ms Lim.

“However, Nicholas’ thinking was: ‘Oh, that person is faster than me. I have to be as fast, if not I am not good enough to work here.’”

She said Mr Tay’s co-workers often look out for him when he shows signs that he is tired or when work is too difficult for him. They then get him to switch duties, to take the load off him.

But Mr Tay initially thought they moved him because he was not doing a good job.

Ms Lim mapped out Mr Tay’s thoughts and shared with him other possibilities – for instance, that co-workers may move him to other duties because they care about him.

“It helps to widen Nicholas’ perspectives and also lets him try to think in different ways,” she said.

To learn more about the causes CFS supports, please click here.

Source: The Straits Times © SPH Media Limited. Permission required for reproduction

I have always been interested in supporting elder care. But there are many charities doing such work that I do not know of. Through CFS, I learnt about Yong-en Care Centre and having seen first-hand what they are doing, I feel that my money is being well-utilised.

For Yong-en Care Centre, meeting donors face-to-face was a valuable opportunity to deepen their understanding of its unique care model and to engage with them on any questions they may have, says Griselda. In addition, it is also an opportunity to thank CFS donors who have been supporting the charity and build a lasting relationship with them.

CFS assists charities and their underprivileged communities by connecting them with donors who are seeking to support causes and crucial needs that resonate with them deeply.


To find out more about the causes we support, please visit 
www.cf.org.sg/what-we-support/.

Picture of admin bluecube
admin bluecube

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Stories Of Impact

Supporting ITE Students through COVID

Picture of John Doe
John Doe
A professional woman in a white shirt and tie stands confidently in front of a projector, ready to deliver a presentation.

As many as 80 percent of ITE students come from low-income families and are receiving bursaries from the government. Kintan Teo is one of them. Her family of four survived on just $800 a month before COVID-19 struck. Her mother, the sole breadwinner, was working as a cleaner.

When Kintan’s mother lost her job in April, the family had to use whatever meagre savings they had to get by. While Kintan’s mother sold baked and cooked food to generate some
income, her earnings were still insufficient to cover their utilities and other bills. Kintan, a Business Studies student at ITE, tried working part-time to supplement the family income but gave it up after a few months. She had to work four to five days a week for up to seven hours daily as a team leader at a chicken wing restaurant.

“The job was physically and emotionally draining. It was difficult for me to work and study at the same time. I didn’t have time to rest as I had to report for work immediately after my lessons and during weekends,” explained Kintan. Left with only five hours of sleep a day, Kintan was constantly tired and found it hard to wake up and stay focused in school. She also didn’t have enough time to do revision and her grades were affected.

Studies Come First
Like Kintan, Passenger Services student Siti Raudhah is struggling to cope with work and studies. Her mother, who works as a cleaner, is the sole breadwinner of her family of five. Since young, Siti has been aware of her family’s financial difficulties. After completing her ‘O’ Levels, she took on part-time jobs in banquet services and retail to supplement her family income.

Siti is currently working part-time at a clothing retail store but is clear that her studies always come first. “Working and studying at the same time is tough. As a slow-learner, I took a
break from my part-time job to catch up on my studies before resuming work. This is how I balance my studies and work,” explained Siti.

Help On the Way
More than 1,000 needy students are dependent on ITE for meals when they are in school. During the Circuit Breaker period, the Recess@Home scheme through the Sayang Sayang Fund made it possible for these students to continue receiving meals. More than $650,000 was contributed, enabling students across primary to tertiary levels to have at least one decent meal a day while on home-based learning.

In addition, some students like Siti receive additional aid under the Special Student Assistance Scheme (SSAS)-Covid, which provides emergency relief for students who are badly affected by the Covid-19 situation. With the help of the $100,000 donation from the Mind The Gap – Knowledge Funds, Siti and others like her have some emergency funds to fall back on to help them tide through this difficult period.

“The additional financial aid has helped my family. My mother is able to buy groceries and I am able to set aside some money for school and other necessities,” said Siti.

Photo credit: ITE

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit dolor

The competition was organised by City Harvest Community Services Association and received support from FUN! Fund, a Community Impact Fund jointly established by the Community Foundation of Singapore and the Agency for Integrated Care, with the aim of addressing social isolation among the elderly.

Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of National Development Mr Tan Kiat How attended the event. He encouraged the elderly to stay physically and mentally well, as well as urging them to participate in community activities and enjoy their golden years together.

Learn more about FUN! Fund at https://www.cf.org.sg/fun-fund/.

 

The programme provides the children with a non-threatening platform to connect with peers and have positive conversations. In addition, it exposes them to different people who can assist to broaden their perspectives.

L.S., a volunteer with the Reading Odyssey programme @ Spooner Road

中心“常胜将军”胡锦盛:比赛限时反应要快

现年92岁的胡锦盛是最年长的参赛者。自2017年退休后,他几乎每天都到活跃乐龄中心报到,从此爱上了玩拉密,每次可玩上三个小时,在中心是“常胜将军”。

Picture of admin bluecube
admin bluecube

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

News

联合早报: 领导基金会教师奖得主: 激发特需学生学习兴趣比成绩更重要

Picture of John Doe
John Doe
a picture of two teachers holding The Leading Foundation Teacher Award

胡洁梅 18 October 2016

特别学校教师郭正才利用乐高让学生创作动画,也利用机器人等来提高学生的学习兴趣。对他而言,学生享受学习过程并从中激发他们的好奇心,这比学生的成品更为重要。

郭正才(33岁)在特别需求者协会东陵学校(APSN Tanglin School)任教,是今年领导基金会教师奖的得主之一。

领导基金会教师奖(The Leading Foundation Teacher Award)自前年起颁发,目的是肯定学前教育工作者、特别需求教师和教育协作人员(Allied Educator)在专业领域的卓越表现。

该基金会由新加坡政府投资公司集团总裁林祥源与女儿林华敏设立,基金会目的是支持教育与领袖培养项目,特别是肯定学前和特别教育工作者的贡献。林祥源曾在不同政府部门任要职,包括公务员首长、教育部常任秘书。

今年共有四人得奖,另三人是人民行动党社区基金会(PCF)Sparkletots学前教育中心教师帕敏吉(Parvinjit Kaur)和扎希拉(Zahirah Bte Surian),以及圣加俾尔中学教育协作员贾雅然(Jeyaram s/o Kadivan)。

郭正才踏入特别教育工作五年,对他而言,获奖是种肯定,但最大的成就感莫过于看到特需学生的才华获得他人赞赏。

他分享说,今年中带领几名学生到新加坡科技设计大学举办的“制汇节”(Maker Faire)参展,由学生介绍他们的三维打印作品。参观者在反馈单中反映对学生作品的欣赏,好些公众表示并没发觉他们是来自特别学校。

他说:“看到学生能够独立,在公众面前展现自信并获得肯定,我更加确信我的(职业)选择是正确的。”

特别需求者协会东陵学校的学生主要患有轻微智力障碍,郭正才是推动科技教学的其中一名教师。他认为,学生在制作机器人(robotics)等时能应用数学和科学概念,激发他们的思考能力和好奇心,学习也更有趣。

另一名得奖教师帕敏吉(36岁)曾是骨科矫形外科助理,因为喜欢与孩童互动,六年前到PCF Sparkletots学前教育中心(兀兰第677座)教书,边工作边进修学前教育课程。她间中也曾到AWWA的特别教育学校工作一年。

她说:“每当看到孩子的笑容,或听他们和我分享故事,我就觉得很欣慰。”

颁奖仪式由国立教育学院和新加坡社会基金会联办,新加坡社会基金会是管理领导基金会的非营利机构。评审来自国立教育学院、教育部和新加坡幼儿教师协会。今年的得奖教师可获得1350元现金和奖状。

Read more.

Picture of admin bluecube
admin bluecube

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

News

S’poreans donated $90m in first five months of 2020, equal to whole of last year’s donations

Picture of John Doe
John Doe
Many pedestrians walking on a bustling city street, surrounded by tall buildings and bustling activity.

SINGAPORE – Singaporeans have stepped up to help those in need and those most affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

From January to May this year, $90 million was donated to the Community Chest, the Community Foundation of Singapore’s Sayang Sayang Fund which was set up in February, and through online donation platform Giving.sg.

This amount was about equal to the overall donations received by the Community Chest and Giving.sg throughout the entire 2019, said the Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth and Ministry of Social and Family Development in a joint statement on Monday (June 22).

The ministries added that more than 13,300 people signed up to volunteer through Giving.sg during the first five months of 2020, compared to 11,300 in the same period last year.

This was despite a decrease in volunteering opportunities during the circuit breaker period.

Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu said that the pandemic had not dampened the spirit of caring among people here but instead brought out the best in Singaporeans and showed that many in the community care about the country deeply.

“Let us to continue to grow this spirit of Singapore Together and partner one another to overcome our challenges. By doing so, we will make it through this difficult period and emerge as a stronger society,” said Ms Fu.

Of the $90 million, $42.2 million was donated to the Community Chest, of which 40 per cent went to Covid-19-related causes.

Donations also came from companies such as security and aerospace firm Lockheed Martin.

The company donated more than $280,000 from its Job Support Scheme payments to The Courage Fund and The Invictus Fund, both of which are managed by the Community Chest.

During the same period last year, the Community Chest collected $22.9 million in donations.

Under the Sayang Sayang Fund, more than 4,500 donors – individuals, multinational corporations and small and medium-sized enterprises – contributed $7.6 million from February to May.

These include pro-wrestling fitness school Grapple Max, which raised $6,000 during an online fundraiser while showing a wrestling match, and home-based skincare start-up Soul Good Project that donated a month’s worth of profits.

“These smaller but equally valuable contributions to the Sayang Sayang Fund reflect the charitable nature of many Singaporeans who are still willing to donate, even in times of adversity,” said the ministries.

The donations to the Sayang Sayang Fund have funded over 330 projects that help individuals, families and seniors from marginalised backgrounds who have been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Giving.sg portal received $40.7 million from January to May, with $20.4 million donated in April, after the first tranche of $600 Solidarity Payments was given out.

The bulk of donors contributed to causes related to Covid-19, such as to help migrant workers and healthcare staff.

The ministries noted that while donations to Covid-19-related causes increased during this period, causes not directly related to the coronavirus experienced a decline in donations.

They added that the Community Chest projected a 20 to 30 per cent drop in donations in 2020 for its funded programmes.

To aid these charities, the National Volunteer and Philanthropy Centre has launched the City of Good Show, an online game show fundraiser.

Episodes will air every Wednesday at 8pm on the centre’s Facebook page from this week on.

Minister for Social and Family Development Desmond Lee said that he was encouraged that the community spirit is strong and Singaporeans from all walks of life have pitched in to help fight against the coronavirus.

He added though that it was imperative to focus on community needs that go beyond the Covid-19-related causes.

“Our social service agencies need our sustained support so that they can continue to deliver critical services, as well as meet growing and more complex needs in our society,” said Mr Lee.

“With everyone lending a helping hand and looking out for one another, Singapore will emerge stronger from Covid-19.”

Source: The Straits Time

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit dolor

The competition was organised by City Harvest Community Services Association and received support from FUN! Fund, a Community Impact Fund jointly established by the Community Foundation of Singapore and the Agency for Integrated Care, with the aim of addressing social isolation among the elderly.

Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of National Development Mr Tan Kiat How attended the event. He encouraged the elderly to stay physically and mentally well, as well as urging them to participate in community activities and enjoy their golden years together.

Learn more about FUN! Fund at https://www.cf.org.sg/fun-fund/.

 

The programme provides the children with a non-threatening platform to connect with peers and have positive conversations. In addition, it exposes them to different people who can assist to broaden their perspectives.

L.S., a volunteer with the Reading Odyssey programme @ Spooner Road

中心“常胜将军”胡锦盛:比赛限时反应要快

现年92岁的胡锦盛是最年长的参赛者。自2017年退休后,他几乎每天都到活跃乐龄中心报到,从此爱上了玩拉密,每次可玩上三个小时,在中心是“常胜将军”。

Picture of admin bluecube
admin bluecube

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

News

Media release: The first Singapore Youth Impact Collective to empower disadvantaged youths

Picture of John Doe
John Doe
A group of people posing (From left) James Tan, Tan-Wu Mei Ling, Justina Tan, Joyce Teo, Dr Ang Kiam Wee, Pang Sze Khai and Jacky Ang
  • This is the first initiative in Singapore that uses the collective impact model, which enables funders and non-profits to own and address complex social issues in a coordinated manner.
  • The Collective aims to increase the ability of disadvantaged youths to progress to working life through training and skills development.

Singapore, 9 October 2018 – The Singapore Youth Impact Collective (the “Collective”) launched two youth empowerment programmes and opened a new A.P.T.I.T.U.D.E. Centre at ITE College Central today, to help disadvantaged youths transition more successfully from the classroom to working life.

The Collective was formed when its members attended a Colabs series on Children & Youth in 2017, and realised that multiple stakeholders are needed to work together to find effective ways to help disadvantaged youths across various life stages.

They recognise that while education can help bridge social gaps, the environment and other socio-economic factors can affect some youths’ socio-emotional development, academic performance, aspirations and employability. This may hinder them in reaching their full potential and transitioning into independent working adults

The Collective comprises six members, namely Changi Foundation, the Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS), Credit Suisse, Octava Foundation, SHINE Children & Youth Services (SHINE) and TOUCH Community Services (TOUCH). To date, the funders have pledged close to $1 million towards the programmes.

“The Singapore Youth Impact Collective is the first such collaboration in Singapore to use the collective impact model,” highlighted Joyce Teo, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, CFS. “This approach acknowledges the value of collaboration in the face of complex social issues that requires the coordinated efforts of multiple entities, usually from different sectors.

“CFS is glad to contribute as a backbone organisation by providing dedicated staff and resources to support this initiative and its participating partners to act in concert along mutual goals.”

Members of the Collective were drawn together through a common vision for change and formed an action plan that coordinates mutually agreed-upon activities which allow members to leverage on each other’s expertise and resources to achieve a set of shared outcomes.

The Collective aims to understand and establish the elements within its programmes that are effective in improving work-readiness for disadvantaged youths. It hopes that non-profits working with youths can then use this knowledge to achieve better outcomes in the future.

They also want to advocate for organisations across different sectors to adopt a collaborative ownership of social issues and be an example or model on how financial and non-financial resources can be provided to complement and build non-profits’ capabilities.

The Collective’s programmes are curated for youths aged 17 to 25 who may require support in school or after graduation as they seek employment. Their aim is to empower 230 youths to be work-ready over the next three years.

“It is a strategic decision for Changi Foundation to join the Collective,” said Ivy Choo, Head, Changi Foundation. “Apart from deepening our learning in the giving space, more importantly, it allows us to better address current needs in the community. By aligning our efforts with that of the other members in the Collective, we can create greater impact for the youths and their future.”

Jacky Ang, Singapore COO and Branch Manager of Credit Suisse AG, Singapore Branch,shared that Credit Suisse is a strong advocate for the collective impact model, having seen success in HK and Malaysia. “The Collective enables companies like Credit Suisse to play an active role as a corporate citizen beyond funding. Every member brings something different to the Collective, be it expertise, networks or in-kind contribution, thus increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication of efforts.”

“Apart from providing funding, Octava Foundation has discovered other ways to contribute towards work-readiness for disadvantaged youth. We realise that there are opportunities to connect the non-profits to businesses that we work with—some of these companies may be potential industry partners for SHINE and TOUCH,” noted Debbie Fang, Head, Octava Foundation.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for TOUCH to work together with like-minded partners to enhance youth development work and develop better training programmes,” shared Anita Low-Lim, Senior Director (Children and Youth Group), TOUCH. “We value the culture of open communication and trust because it allows everyone at the table to learn from each other and explore better ways of working.”

“Through the Collective, SHINE hopes to extend its work to address needs that we were not previously able to on our own,” affirmed Benjamin Teo, Centre Director for Yishun Centre, SHINE. “The collective impact model brings us all to the table equitably, and allows non-profits to tackle operational challenges alongside funders. I believe this will help us work towards a more lasting impact for our youths and their families.”

With the launch of the programmes, TOUCH and SHINE welcome moreindustry partners andcompanies who are willing to provide opportunities for internships and job immersion experiences for the youths.

Interested parties who would like to help with training and work opportunities are invited to contact youthcollective@cf.org.sg for more information on how they can support this programme.

ABOUT THE PROGRAMMES

The Collective’s goal is to improve work-readiness for disadvantaged young persons by:
–      encouraging their attainment of educational or vocational qualifications;
–      developing their socio-emotional skills and personal assets; and
–      changing their aspirations and providing them access to employment opportunities.

TOUCH and SHINE’s programmes include these elements in their programme design, and are targeted at youth at different stages of transition to work. TOUCH works with students in school, while SHINE will work with youth who may have finished their national service or graduated from school, who can benefit from additional support in gaining employment.

A.P.T.I.T.U.D.E @ ITE College Central
TOUCH’s A.P.T.I.T.U.D.E is based in ITE College Central. The programme complements the vocational training that ITE students are learning in school. It develops students’ interests into practical market skills through close mentorship from industry experts and TOUCH youth coaches.

Through this framework, the students are able to form a secure attachment with mentors and be guided in the right direction in terms of developing their passions into practical market skills. A.P.T.I.T.U.D.E involves seven Interest Groups in areas such as Barista, Adventure Facilitation, Adventure Sports, Outdoor Events Management, Wedding Planning, Culinary Arts and Photography.

YOUTH FORTE
SHINE’s YOUTH FORTE programme targets youths 17 to 21 years’ old who are not in school or training, or sustainable employment of longer than six months, and are facing transition issues to workforce.

YOUTH FORTE takes the youths through various stages including evaluation, individual coaching, socio-emotional training, employability skills training, internships or project-based experience, and vocational training leading to WSQ certification. Throughout the process, youths receive individual life coaching.

Youths are deemed to have completed the programme when, armed with better socio-emotional competencies and the confidence to deal with work challenges, they stay in employment for at least six months.

ABOUT THE SINGAPORE YOUTH IMPACT COLLECTIVE MEMBERS

Changi Foundation
Changi Foundation was launched in April 2012 to support and reach out to disadvantaged youths, a social cause that Changi Airport Group (CAG) has supported since 2010. Each year, CAG allocates a percentage of its net profit to the Changi Foundation, which supports youth community efforts. Through the programmes and projects funded by the Changi Foundation, CAG aims to touch the lives of 600 youths each year.

Community Foundation of Singapore
The Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS) is a non-profit organisation founded in 2008 to encourage and enable philanthropy in Singapore. CFS matches donors’ interests with causes and offer ways for them to make a greater impact through their charitable funds. CFS also collaborates with charity partners to identify programmes that support diverse communities. Its purpose is to enable real and meaningful change while inspiring a philanthropic culture in Singapore. CFS is a registered charity with Institution of a Public Character status.

Credit Suisse
Credit Suisse AG is one of the world’s leading financial services providers. At Credit Suisse, we believe that education is one of the keys to inclusive economic growth. Credit Suisse’s Global Education Initiative and our regional education activities support a variety of programs improving access to education and quality educational opportunities. At Credit Suisse Asia Pacific, our philanthropy work supports selected organisations that provide disadvantaged children and youth with access to quality education and employability skills that pave their entry to the workforce. We also support programs that build the entrepreneurial mindset in young people across all societal groups.

Octava Foundation
Founded in 2016, Octava Foundation seeks to provide access to education and opportunities for children and youth from economically disadvantaged families to enable them to have sustainable livelihoods, achieve their aspirations and achieve self-efficacy.

SHINE Children & Youth Services
SHINE believes in the right of every child and youth to shine. Towards this end, it reaches out to children, youth and their families through school-based, centre-based and community-based social work and educational psychology programmes so as to enable children and youth to maximise their potential.

TOUCH Community Services
TOUCH Community Services is a not-for-profit charitable organisation, dedicated to meeting the needs of children from low-income or single parent families, youths-at-risk, needy families, people with special and healthcare needs, and frail elderly. Through its network of 18 services, TOUCH is committed to serving people of all ages, races, religions and backgrounds. Each year, its programmes and services meet the needs of more than 31,000 clients.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit dolor

The competition was organised by City Harvest Community Services Association and received support from FUN! Fund, a Community Impact Fund jointly established by the Community Foundation of Singapore and the Agency for Integrated Care, with the aim of addressing social isolation among the elderly.

Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of National Development Mr Tan Kiat How attended the event. He encouraged the elderly to stay physically and mentally well, as well as urging them to participate in community activities and enjoy their golden years together.

Learn more about FUN! Fund at https://www.cf.org.sg/fun-fund/.

 

The programme provides the children with a non-threatening platform to connect with peers and have positive conversations. In addition, it exposes them to different people who can assist to broaden their perspectives.

L.S., a volunteer with the Reading Odyssey programme @ Spooner Road

中心“常胜将军”胡锦盛:比赛限时反应要快

现年92岁的胡锦盛是最年长的参赛者。自2017年退休后,他几乎每天都到活跃乐龄中心报到,从此爱上了玩拉密,每次可玩上三个小时,在中心是“常胜将军”。

Picture of admin bluecube
admin bluecube

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Trending Stories

Scroll to Top