Stories Of Impact
A Donor’s Journey: Learn how we are partnering The Maanas Cares Foundation to Leave a Legacy of Positive Change
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Stories Of Impact

Stories Of Impact

A Donor’s Journey: Learn how we are partnering The Maanas Cares Foundation to Leave a Legacy of Positive Change

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Philanthropy is more than just a gesture of goodwill; it’s a journey towards making a lasting impact on society. For the founders of the Maanas Cares Foundation, Manoj, Sreevidhya and their children, Aditya and Nitya, this journey began with a vision of creating a legacy of compassion and support for those in need. Partnering with the Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS), they have transformed their philanthropic aspirations into tangible action, supporting a range of causes that are close to their hearts.

Founders of the Maanas Cares Foundation, Manoj and Sreevidhya, with their children, Aditya and Nitya

Philanthropy is more than just a gesture of goodwill; it’s a journey towards making a lasting impact on society. For the founders of the Maanas Cares Foundation, Manoj, Sreevidhya and their children, Aditya and Nitya, this journey began with a vision of creating a legacy of compassion and support for those in need. Partnering with the Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS), they have transformed their philanthropic aspirations into tangible action, supporting a range of causes that are close to their hearts.

 

For over two decades, the founders of the Maanas Cares Foundation have given to charitable causes. A few years ago, they decided to deepen their impact, to make a more significant and enduring contribution that would extend beyond their lifetimes. As working professionals at the peak of their careers, they found it challenging to dedicate the necessary time to support these activities. This led them to seek out an organisation with a proven track record to handle the administrative aspects of their philanthropic efforts. That’s when they discovered CFS.

 

“We were struck by how well CFS’s mission and ideals matched our own goals for philanthropy,” they said. “This alignment inspired us to explore possibilities with CFS, leading to the creation of the Maanas Cares Foundation. This partnership has allowed us to channel our passion and resources towards causes that are close to our hearts, ensuring that our contributions make a tangible difference to the lives of others.”

Passion-Driven Philanthropy

The Maanas Cares Foundation focuses on three main causes: supporting seniors, caregiver support, and education. Each of these areas holds personal significance for the founders.

In a rapidly ageing society like Singapore, the well-being of seniors is a growing concern. “We have seen how some elders, without immediate family support, find solace in old age homes,” they explained. “This has fuelled our determination to support the well-being of seniors and caregivers, addressing both health issues and social isolation.”

Education, another key focus, is deeply rooted in their family values. Having several educators in the family, they have directly experienced the profound impact of education. “Access to quality education can empower individuals to overcome adversity, break the cycle of poverty, and build brighter futures,” they said. “We want to provide support to the less privileged, enabling them to explore the world beyond their circumstances.”

CFS has played a pivotal role in enabling the Maanas Cares Foundation to pursue these passions. With the guidance of a dedicated philanthropy advisor, the donors have gained a comprehensive understanding of Singapore’s charitable landscape. This knowledge has informed their decisions, allowing them to strategically allocate resources to areas where there is the greatest need.

Leading & Empowering the Next Generation


Determined to leave a legacy of compassion and empathy, and to educate the future generation about charity, the founders have also brought their children on this journey.

They also recently established a named, endowed bursary at Republic Polytechnic, marking a significant step in their legacy giving. “We firmly believe in the transformative power of education,” they said. “By supporting students at Republic Polytechnic, we aim to empower individuals who may otherwise lack the resources to pursue higher education.”

The endowed bursary aims to break down financial barriers, enabling deserving students to pursue their academic and career aspirations without the burden of financial constraints. “We envision a future where talented individuals from diverse backgrounds have equal access to educational opportunities,” they said. “We hope our legacy gift will inspire others to join similarly in supporting education and creating positive change.”

Strategic Giving for Lasting Impact

One of the significant advantages of partnering with CFS is the flexibility and efficiency of the Donor-Advised Fund (DAF) structure. This structure allows the Maanas Cares Foundation to fund their foundation when it is most convenient, such as during times of bonuses or capital gains. CFS handles all the administration, providing a seamless and efficient process.

Reflecting on their journey with CFS, the founders highlighted several key takeaways:

  1. Ease and Speed of Setup: “The process of setting up and running our foundation with CFS was remarkably simple and swift. Even during the pandemic, everything was managed virtually and smoothly.”
  2. Informed Decision-Making: “CFS provided us with a menu of choices – causes that needed support. They offered detailed information on each cause, helping us make informed decisions quickly.”
  3. Impact Monitoring: “CFS provides a ‘report card’ at the end of the year, detailing how our contributions were used, and the outcomes achieved. This transparency allows us to evaluate the impact of our giving and plan future contributions more effectively.”

Words of Wisdom for Aspiring Philanthropists

To those considering starting their philanthropic journey, the founders of the Maanas Cares Foundation offer the following advice:

  1. Start Small but Start Now: “Don’t wait until retirement to begin your philanthropic journey. The best time to start is during the peak of your career when you are earning the most.”
  2. Reflect on Your Passions and Values: “Identify the causes that resonate with you and align your contributions accordingly. This will make your giving more meaningful and impactful.”
  3. Choose a Reputable Partner: “Partnering with an organization like CFS can simplify the process and ensure your contributions are managed effectively. Their expertise and support can help you make a lasting impact.”

Embarking on a philanthropic journey with the Community Foundation of Singapore has enabled the founders of the Maanas Cares Foundation to create a legacy of compassion and support. Their story is a testament to the power of strategic giving and the profound impact it can have on society. By sharing their journey, they hope to inspire others to join them in making a difference, creating a brighter and more equitable future for all.

Get in touch to speak to us about how you can tap on CFS’s expertise for your giving journey.

 

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News

Start a donor-advised fund: plan your giving flexibly and sustainably

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The breakfast huddle with Catherine Loh: A group of individuals gathered around a table, engaged in a morning discussion.

CEO Catherine Loh goes on Money FM 89.3 to speak about the donor-advised funds.

Elliott Danker: Funds such as DAFs are especially needed during the current COVID-19 pandemic because that’s where you have more people in need. Many charities have shared that donations have been falling.

Manisha Tank: A DAF allows donors to give in a more informed, structured and sustained manner over time. As of March 2020, there are 143 DAFs set up with CFS, which is double the number in March 2015. How does a DAF actually work and why has there been an increase in the number of DAFs over the years?

Elliott: With us is Catherine Loh, CEO of the Community Foundation of Singapore. We’ve been trying to describe and nail down the meaning of donor-advised funds or DAFs. It’s like a personal charitable savings account; is there anything more you could tell us about DAFs?

Catherine Loh: It’s easier to give you a concrete example. One such DAF is the SR Nathan Education Upliftment Fund, which was set up by our late president when he retired in 2011. As he had received help himself back when he was young, Mr Nathan wanted to set up a fund to help students at risk of dropping out of school due to financial difficulties.

So through this one endowment fund established with us, he was able to reach out to many educational institutions like ITE (Institute of Technical Education), various polytechnics and universities to support students in need. Some special schools like the Mountbatten vocational school and even the four self-help groups have benefitted.

Even though he is no longer with us, we work with a committee comprising a family member, close friends and those who have a deep interest in the community to guide the fund. Over the years, thousands of students have obtained their diplomas and degrees with the support from the Fund. Hopefully from the example you can see that for a donor-advised fund, donors get to name their fund, to choose the causes that they are interested in supporting, and they can use the fund to support more than one charity. There’s a lot of flexibility here.

Manisha: Is a DAF only for the wealthy?

Catherine: There is a minimum amount to set up a donor-advised fund. The minimum amount is $200,000 but a donor can start off with $50,000 and fulfil the pledge over a period of time.

Elliott: How big is the concept of a DAF in Singapore when compared to the rest of the region or the world?

Catherine: This concept is pretty new. In Southeast Asia, we are one of the few established community foundations. However, in the US community foundations are very well established and donations into donor-advised funds are large.

Manisha: If you’re someone who’s decided on having a DAF to take care of your charitable causes and your contributions, is the due diligence all done for you?

Catherine: Before we talk about a charity or their programmes to a donor, we would have done the basic due diligence; checking up on their finances, making sure it is a charity that is doing good work. When we recommend, we try to match the donor’s interest with what the charities can offer and really helping the donors achieve their objectives.

Manisha: Do the donors come to you for different reasons, or some have just come into money and have decided to do something useful with it?

Catherine: People come with their personal reasons, but most do want to do good and they do want to give. The whole purpose is to ensure that their money is put to good use. They want to have the peace of mind that the charities are doing the work that they are supposed to do. This is where we can help to provide the professional advice and to give them the peace of mind.

Elliott: You talked about the minimum amount to start a DAF. How do you start one, and if I’m opening one with CFS, do I have to pay a fee?

Catherine: It is signing a deed and that’s it. It takes about two to four weeks depending on the complexity of the donor’s unique circumstances and what their requirements are. But it is definitely easier than setting up your own family foundation or a corporate foundation.

Manisha: Why has there been an increase in the number of DAFs?

Catherine: We have seen an increase in awareness as we have also been more active in explaining this concept to the public. Over the years, we’ve had happy donors referring their friends and colleagues to us and we’re glad that we’ve gained the trust of our donors and charity partners alike

We’ve also seen an increase in demand because this structure meets the needs of many donors. We’ve established funds for both individuals and businesses; individuals set up memorial funds to remember a loved one or to celebrate significant events like retirements, birthdays and wedding anniversaries. DAFs are useful for financial and legacy planning as well, because donations into a fund can be eligible for two and a half times deduction off taxable income. It can be used as an instrument for tax planning. It can also be named as a beneficiary in a will or a trust. Increasingly, we work with lawyers and executors of wills to administer money left behind for charity.

Very often executors are left vague instructions to just gift the money to charity, and by working with us they have the peace of mind that there are professionals working to identify the right charities and programmes for them.

Manisha: What are the differences between giving to charity and setting up a DAF?

Catherine: If the donor is interested in accountability and transparency and they want to keep track of the donations for regular, long term and more strategic giving, then a DAF is very useful. What we want is for the donor to understand the cause or causes that they are interested in, to get to know the charities and the types of programmes that are out there. Once the donor gets involved, they are more likely to support their causes for a long period of time.

Manisha: One of the best things to donate is time; does that happen and do the donors get involved with these causes and turn up in person to see what’s on the ground?

Catherine: We do have donors who do that whenever they have the time. They are busy professionals who may not have a lot of time and they just give with money first. But we do encourage them to get involved and not just themselves but with their families. Very often we want to not only engage the donors but their family members as well, to get them to understand what they are really helping. In so doing, they would be the ones coming up with new ideas and working directly with the charities to create positive social change. This is a culture that we want to build in Singapore.

Elliott: Some charities are suffering during this COVID-19 pandemic, unable to have fundraising dinners; what has the impact of the pandemic been on DAFs? Should people consider going into a DAF during this pandemic because it’s more focused and safer with due diligence all done?

Catherine: We have seen activity throughout this whole year, so activity hasn’t slowed down for us at all. In fact, donors are talking to use because they want to know how they can help over the longer term; they want to know what are the underfunded sectors and the pressing issues that need
support going forward.

What this pandemic has taught is that it is good to be prepared. As the pandemic continues, we have rising unemployment, health risks and donations from the general public that have decreased. For the donors who have planned their giving and established their donor-advised funds in the past with us, this is an opportunity where they have stepped up. Over the past few months, we have seen a very significant amount being given out from our existing donor-advised funds to COVID-19 related causes.

Manisha: What about businesses?

Catherine: We have quite a few businesses who have established donor-advised funds with us as well. There are many reasons for doing so. There is more marketing mileage with a named fund; this can be a starting point to learn about philanthropy before setting up their own corporate foundation. They use it for planning and tracking their charitable budget, and also to give more strategically by tapping on our knowledge, experience and network in the sector.

Elliott: Is it more high network individuals that are taking part in donor-advised funds?

Catherine: For the Community Foundation of Singapore, a donor-advised fund is just one product which we offer; these are targeted at those who have more to give and they want to give in a longer term manner, so their own named fund is suitable. However, we established our own Community Impact Funds (CIF) in response to social issues that we want to address; you may have heard of the Sayang Sayang Fund which was set up in February as an emergency response fund in the wake of COVID-19.

These kinds of Community Impact Funds receive thousands of donations with thousands of donors donating to these funds. These people could be anywhere from students to retirees, anybody who is linked or feels close to the cause.

Listen to the full interview here:
https://omny.fm/shows/money-fm-893/the-rise-of-donor-advised-funds-in-singapore

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The competition was organised by City Harvest Community Services Association and received support from FUN! Fund, a Community Impact Fund jointly established by the Community Foundation of Singapore and the Agency for Integrated Care, with the aim of addressing social isolation among the elderly.

Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of National Development Mr Tan Kiat How attended the event. He encouraged the elderly to stay physically and mentally well, as well as urging them to participate in community activities and enjoy their golden years together.

Learn more about FUN! Fund at https://www.cf.org.sg/fun-fund/.

 

The programme provides the children with a non-threatening platform to connect with peers and have positive conversations. In addition, it exposes them to different people who can assist to broaden their perspectives.

L.S., a volunteer with the Reading Odyssey programme @ Spooner Road

中心“常胜将军”胡锦盛:比赛限时反应要快

现年92岁的胡锦盛是最年长的参赛者。自2017年退休后,他几乎每天都到活跃乐龄中心报到,从此爱上了玩拉密,每次可玩上三个小时,在中心是“常胜将军”。

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Opinion

Accessing Quality Education: Beyond the Classroom Walls

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a person teaching a group of children

The education of a generation is an extensive and complex undertaking.

Consider the span of time it takes to bring a single individual from nursery and preschool, through the primary and secondary school levels to the various branches of tertiary education. This journey could range from at least 12 years to almost three decades for the dedicated academic.

Keep in mind the need to cater to the individual’s development along the entire stretch in terms of how he or she learns, their psychosocial, physical, emotional and mental health, and their attitudes during the learning process. Now multiply that by over 30,000 for the number of students in each cohort year in Singapore, and you get a sense of the seemingly impossible task that faces the Ministry of Education.

The 32,000 plus teachers in Singapore (MOE, 2021) are doing a highly commendable job as it is. Singapore is ranked 21st in the latest education ranking of the Best Countries Report (World Population Review, 2022) and topped the world in the 2018 Global Competence test, conducted as part of the Programme for International Student Assessment (ST, 2020).

The Singapore education system also has facilities and options for those with learning disabilities, allowing those with conditions such as autism and Down syndrome to obtain a formal education, with pathways to employment for those who are able to do so.

There is a plethora of exit points for those who graduate from the education system here. Besides those with learning disabilities, one could complete formal education after attaining a polytechnic diploma, a university degree or even a doctorate.

While some of that depends on their innate aptitude for study, the students’ early childhood education plays a large part. While it is compulsory for all Singaporean citizens to attend primary school (MOE, 2021), the same is not true for preschool.

Government statistics reflect that nearly 99% of children in Singapore would have at least some preschool education by the age of six (MSF, 2016). This is commendable, but many still do not get the essential foundation that preschools offer, which leads in part to the learning difficulties (not to be confused with disabilities) that some children may face in keeping pace with their peers (Channel News Asia, 2019).

Learning difficulties are when a child, whose IQ is not affected, finds it challenging to learn in a particular way (MyLife Care, 2018). It could stem from conditions such as dyslexia or psychological issues such as anxiety and depression, inhibiting the child’s learning abilities and approach to studies.

Children with learning difficulties face problems with literacy and numeracy (Raising Children, 2021), which is an issue as English and Mathematics are the two core subjects that determine entry into post-secondary education.

Fortunately, there are many groups who are supporting children and youth struggling with primary and secondary school education. Although they are not teachers per se, the programme staff and volunteers of these groups are helping children with learning difficulties, who are usually from challenging backgrounds, to improve their academic abilities.

For instance, social enterprise Catch Them Young’s programme KidsExcel is partnering with the Lions Community Service Foundation to help primary- and secondary-going school children in their academic curriculum.

KidsExcel complements their tutoring time with workshops in sports and drama, which motivates the children to improve academically and to enjoy these popular activities offered by KidsExcel staff.

“I love interacting with the kids and I want to make a positive impact in their lives,” enthuses volunteer Ms Joycelyn Fung. “I have forged good relationships with the children and their parents. In the two years I have been here, it has been very fulfilling and rewarding to see the kids develop and grow.”

Resilience is a clear lesson learnt by KidsExcel care recipients, with 10-year-old Syakir stating that he would never give up in his pursuits, while 12-year-old Elfie proclaims: “I will never stop when I am tired, but will stop when I am done.”

Staff Madam Haznita shares: “It has been a joy working with the kids. Some came with little confidence and had difficulties adjusting, so we needed to spend time getting to know them better and help them settle. It is very rewarding to know they look forward to KidsExcel classes and seeing them every week. This is what motivates me.”

Another programme, Reading Odyssey by SHINE Children and Youth Services, helps to boost children’s literary abilities by inculcating a love for stories through story-telling and literature-related activities.

Taking these children onto journeys of the imagination to improve their linguistic capabilities are volunteers Bee Peng and Natasha. Every week, they tap into their dramatis personae and bring stories to life for the children.

“I like everything in Reading Odyssey, especially the games,” says P2 student beneficiary Kim Yan. “Teacher Bee Peng helps me to understand how the games are played. She is kind and patient. I thank her for teaching me.”

Bee Peng says: “I believe in the quality of Reading Odyssey; it has a positive impact on the lives of the children and has elements of character building. And I truly enjoy interacting with the children.”

Another P2 child, Divinya, demonstrates her newfound verbosity: “I like the games in Reading Odyssey and the snacks given out. My teacher Natasha helps me with reading unfamiliar words. If I don’t know the words, she helps me to pronounce them and tells me the meaning of the words. She is always present for the sessions, she never absents herself. She is always there for me. Thank you teacher, for teaching me and giving me lots of stars.” Divinya also expressed a wish for Natasha to continue teaching her in Reading Odyssey, a testament to the positive impact that even volunteers can have on our children.

A volunteer since 2017, Natasha believes in the programme’s aim of elevating the children’s self-confidence through learning and reading: “There are many opportunities to interact with the children via discussion of the stories, which allows me to journey with them and help them improve.”

Regardless of their motivation, it is clear from the number of children going through such programmes—about 350 and 180 annually from the KidsExcel and Reading Odyssey programmes—that programme staff and volunteers for such extracurricular activities are just as much teachers to our children as educators in school.

If you would like to support programmes such Reading Odyssey and KidsExcel in providing quality education to our children and make a difference in their lives, please visit Ways to give.

This article was written CFS Principal Consultant Reutens-Tan. He is an experienced sustainability advocate and practitioner, working closely with charities to build thriving communities, which he believes is key to a sustainable Singapore.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of CFS or its members.

References

Channel New Asia. (15 September 2019). Commentary: Long-neglected but now in the spotlight, Singapore’s pre-school sectorhttps://www.channelnewsasia.com/commentary/pre-school-enhanced-subsidies-access-moe-kindergartens-859951

Ministry of Education. (18 October 2021). Compulsory education.
https://www.moe.gov.sg/primary/compulsory-education#:~:text=All%20Singapore%20Citizens%20born%20after,deferment%20to%20enter%20Primary%201
.

Ministry of Education. (Accessed 26 July 2022). Education Statistics Digest 2021
https:/www.moe.gov.sg/-/media/files/about-us/education-statistics-digest-2021.ashx?la=en&hash=9E7EFD9B8088817C207F8AE797037AAA2A49F167

MyLife Care. 20 September 2018. What Is The Difference Between ‘Learning Difficulties’ And ‘Learning Disabilities’? https://mylifehomecare.co.uk/insight/learning-difficulties-learning-disabilities-difference/#:~:text=a%20learning%20disability%20constitutes%20a,overall%20IQ%20of%20an%20individual

Raising Children. (2 July 2021). Learning difficulties and learning disorders: children and teenagers.
https://raisingchildren.net.au/school-age/school-learning/learning-difficulties/learning-disabilities-signs-and-support

The Straits Times. (22 October 2020). Singapore’s 15-year-olds top OECD’s Pisa global competence test.
https://str.sg/J62f

World Population Review. (Accessed 26 July 2022). Education Rankings by Country 2022.  
https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/education-rankings-by-country

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News

Singapore Tatler: Kith and Kin

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Family relaxing on couch, on a magazine. (Singapore Tatler Upfront)

The family behind Naumi Hotels and Rang Mahal Restaurants, Surya, Ritu and Gaurang Jhunjhnuwala, shares how its late patriarch Shyam Sundar Jhunjhnuwala’s spirit of entrepreneurship and giving lives on through the generations with the S S Jhunjhuwala Charity Fund established with the Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS). With philanthropic advice from CFS, the family continues its patriarch’s legacies and focuses on education, welfare initiatives, as well as health-related issues for underprivileged women and children in Singapore. Read more.

Courtesy of Singapore Tatler, February 2019

Speaking after the association’s annual general meeting at Kallang Netball Centre on Friday, Liang-Lin, a fund manager for a US$7 billion (S$9.5 billion) firm focused on green real estate investments in Asia, hopes to bring her expertise to the table and increase the amount of financial support for Singapore netball during her four-year term.

The 53-year-old took over from Deputy Speaker of Parliament Jessica Tan, who has been the association’s president since 2012. Tan had reached the end of her tenure, which saw the national team make several breakthroughs, including a gold medal at the 2015 SEA Games in Singapore.

Liang-Lin holds various appointments such as being Singapore’s representative to the G20 for Women appointed by the Ministry of Finance. She is also a board member of the Community Foundation of Singapore, which promotes philanthropy through facilitating the establishment of charitable funds.

She said: “One of the things that is overlooked when we look at philanthropy and fundraising is that sport is not really part of the things that people will automatically think about.

“Less than one per cent of the funds that we raise in the Community Foundation goes to sport. The values that sport brings need to be amplified more, so that corporates… see the need to support sport. I think that link needs to be stronger so that we get not just more corporate sponsors, but also they can come in for longer periods of time.”

While national agency Sport Singapore provides funding to netball, corporates can also do their part, she added.

She said: “If we play our cards correctly, we can get corporates to come in and hopefully support them, to see the wider purpose of sport and bring the nation together.”

She also hopes the association can be proactive in looking for financial support, adding: “We must work more strategically with governing bodies on educating corporates on the importance of really supporting sport.”

The former netball player also made references to the recent Women’s World Cup for football, noting the “ability for a game that focuses on women in the sport to bring global attention”.

She said: “I want that kind of trajectory of the limelight going to women’s sport. I think that is a trend that will continue, and I hope that netball will be part of that trend.”

Meanwhile, Tan was satisfied that she has achieved the three objectives she had set out to do when she came on board – to improve quality of play, build a fan base and create an ecosystem which involves coaches and players.

The 57-year-old added: “As much as I do feel sad about having to step down, but at the same time, leadership renewal is very important.

“I think Trina will help to galvanise the team together, and bring a lot of new perspectives and quality to the association.”

Join us in making an impact on Singapore sports scene! Reach out to us for more information.

Source: The Straits Times © SPH Media Limited. Permission required for reproduction

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The competition was organised by City Harvest Community Services Association and received support from FUN! Fund, a Community Impact Fund jointly established by the Community Foundation of Singapore and the Agency for Integrated Care, with the aim of addressing social isolation among the elderly.

Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of National Development Mr Tan Kiat How attended the event. He encouraged the elderly to stay physically and mentally well, as well as urging them to participate in community activities and enjoy their golden years together.

Learn more about FUN! Fund at https://www.cf.org.sg/fun-fund/.

 

The programme provides the children with a non-threatening platform to connect with peers and have positive conversations. In addition, it exposes them to different people who can assist to broaden their perspectives.

L.S., a volunteer with the Reading Odyssey programme @ Spooner Road

中心“常胜将军”胡锦盛:比赛限时反应要快

现年92岁的胡锦盛是最年长的参赛者。自2017年退休后,他几乎每天都到活跃乐龄中心报到,从此爱上了玩拉密,每次可玩上三个小时,在中心是“常胜将军”。

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News

Posts of the late former Law Society President Adrian Tan has been published as a book
律师公会已故前会长陈锦海 曾发表贴文已结集成书

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LinkedIn posts by the late Mr Adrian Tan have recently been compiled and published as a book, titled “If I were King of Singapore”. 

All proceeds from the book will go to the Adrian Tan Memorial Fund, which is set up by Mrs Adrian Tan and managed by the Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS). 

This fund focuses on two primary causes that are close to Adrian’s heart: ensuring marginalised communities have access to legal services through Pro Bono SG and advocating the welfare of migrant workers.

Learn how CFS can support you in making an impact towards the causes that you care about: https://cf.org.sg/donors/how-we-assist-donors/.

Book by Adrian Tan, with the title 'If I were King of Singapore'
新加坡律师公会已故前会长陈锦海的妻子,把他的LinkedIn贴文结合成书出版。《如果我是新加坡国王》所有收益将投入去年以他名义设立的“陈锦海纪念基金”。(叶振忠摄)

LinkedIn posts by the late Mr Adrian Tan have recently been compiled and published as a book, titled “If I were King of Singapore”. 

All proceeds from the book will go to the Adrian Tan Memorial Fund, which is set up by Mrs Adrian Tan and managed by the Community Foundation of Singapore (CFS). 

This fund focuses on two primary causes that are close to Adrian’s heart: ensuring marginalised communities have access to legal services through Pro Bono SG and advocating the welfare of migrant workers.

Learn how CFS can support you in making an impact towards the causes that you care about: https://cf.org.sg/donors/how-we-assist-donors/.

2023年因病过世的新加坡律师公会前会长陈锦海律师,生前在LinkedIn发表的“如果我是新加坡国王”系列贴文已经结集成书,收入全数投入去年以他名义设立的“陈锦海纪念基金”。

陈锦海生前是义正律师事务所(TSMP Law Corporation)的合伙人,遗孀去年通过新加坡社区基金会(The Community Foundation of Singapore),设立纪念基金。

《联合早报》通过义正律所联合管理合伙人张祉盈律师,电邮访问陈锦海的妻子。

不愿具名的陈太太说,纪念基金旨在支持陈锦海撰写文章和社媒贴文常提起值得支持的慈善项目,“继续他的工作和精神遗产是有意义的”。

陈太太不愿透露纪念基金的金额,但根据新加坡社区基金会网站资料,设立基金的门槛为20万元。

基金的指定受益人都是陈锦海生前热衷的慈善项目,包括新加坡法律义务办事处(Pro Bono SG)和客工援助组织“康侍”(Healthserve)。

陈太太说,陈锦海在担任律师公会会长期间,强烈觉得新加坡法律义务办事处援助无力承担法律服务者的工作做得出色,所以基金将给予支持。为客工提供心理健康咨询,也将是基金的支持项目。

在法律界30多年的陈锦海,2022年1月起担任律师公会会长,上任两个月后不幸患癌,去年7月8日与世长辞,得年57岁。

 

撰写《纯爱手册》畅销书 自给自足完成大学教育


1988年,陈锦海在新加坡国立大学法学院念大一时,先后撰写刻画本地初级学院学生生活的《纯爱手册》上下集——“The Teenage Textbook”和“The Teenage Workbook”。

两本书成为畅销书,曾登上舞台剧、拍成电影和电视剧,而他也靠两本书的收入自给自足,完成大学教育。

陈太太说,尽管出身卑微,陈锦海对自己有机会追求法律职业向来很感恩。为了纪念他这份感激之情,她将另设“陈锦海助学金”协助国大的贫困法学生。

陈锦海敢怒敢言,在去世前的三年多,他在社媒积极发表法律相关贴文,旨在提高公众的法律知识。

因笔调活泼,涵盖法律变革、无偿服务和客工课题等的内容生动易读,赢得好评,LinkedIn的追踪者达3万8000个。

陈锦海曾说自己有时要评论新加坡政府的政策,却不想说“如果我是政府”,所以选择以“如果我是新加坡国王”的诙谐方式表达,“因为我们知道,这里暂时还没有国王”。

陈太太说,陈锦海一直想再出书,却被病症阻碍,“他不会想到,自己在LinkedIn发表的系列贴文会取得巨大成功,最终结集成书”。

“他去世后,公众和认识他的人都深切悲痛,许多人,甚至是通过LinkedIn认识他的人,都表示会想念他和他的作品。”

 

新书让陈锦海的声音永存

 

陈太太透露,很多人要求保留陈锦海的LinkedIn账户,以便继续阅读他生前的想法。

“这本书就这样出版了。对许多被他感动的人来说,这是让他的声音继续存在的一种方式。”

《如果我是新加坡国王》已在纪伊国屋书店(Kinokuniya)、大众书局、Book Bar和WHSmith樟宜分店出售。

信用:联合早报©新报业媒体有限公司。复制需要许可

This article was originally published in Zaobao here. Source: Zaobao © SPH Media Limited. Permission required for reproduction.

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